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John Barleycorn

Here's little Sir John in a nut-brown bowl,
and brandy in the glass.
And little Sir John in a nut-brown bowl
is the stronger man at last.
For the hunter, he can't hunt the fox,
nor loudly blow his horn,
And the tinker, he can't mend kettles or pots
without a little John Barleycorn
From the Traditional

John Barleycorn:Links

John Barleycorn: A nice page from White Wolf Magazine
John Barleycorn:
Harvest Home:

JOHN BARLEYCORN

JOHN BARLEYCORN:In English and Scottish folklore,personification of barley,the grain used to produce liqours.
The Facts of File Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend. Anthony S. Mecantante
1998:Facts of File

Barley To cry barley . To ask for truce (in children's games). Query, a corruption of parley.
"A proper lad o' his quarters, that will not cry barley in a brulzīe." - Sir W. Scott: Waverley , xiii.
Barley-bree Barley-broth; that is, malt liquor brewed from barley (Scotch). "The cock may craw, the day may daw, And aye we'll taste the barley-bree." Burns: Willie Brew'd a Peck o' Maut .
Barley Cap To wear the barley cap . To be top-heavy or tipsy with barley-bree. The liquor got into the head.
Barleycorn John or Sir John Barleycorn . A personification of malt liquor. The term has been made popular by Robert Burns.
"Inspiring bold John Barleycorn,
What dangers thou canst make us scorn!" Burns: Tam o' Shanter, 105, 106.

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